Hands painting hands

23 01 2013

I’ve taken on a new series recently. I realized that quite a lot of my work has hands in it. They are part of the stories that are told through my art. A lot can be told through the expression of hands. With this discovery, I decided to paint hands on purpose… Instead of being a vehicle to tell the story. They ARE the story. I debuted six new paintings at the Hartford Open Studio in November. I’ve since done two more paintings to compliment that series. I will continue to explore hands in the future. Here are a few photos of the artwork framed. (I’m not a great photographer, so please bear with me!)

Hands-framed

The ones on the bottom are the new ones. The guitar playing hands belong to fellow painter, Jason Werner. And the “I love you” sign language hand is my own hand. This one is painted in particular for a show coming up here at Artspace. You can read about it here.

Here is a close up version of the hands with a guitar:

Guitar Hands

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Art for the Open Heart

22 01 2013

February 9, 6-9pm
Artspace Gallery
555 Asylum Ave, Hartford, CT


I will be participating in this exhibition coming up at Artspace. It is a fundraiser to help Tao LaBossiere pay  for his open heart surgery that he will need in February. Tao has been instrumental in the growth of Artspace gallery and the Hartford art community as a whole. He has been a resident of Artspace since it’s inception in 1997, and is the volunteer director of the gallery.

I have created this piece specifically for this event. “I love you” Painted with oils. There is a heart in the background, it’s kind of hard to tell with the lighting, but it’s there. Love and all. ❤

I Love Hands

From the Facebook event page:

Not to be missed exhibit will feature hundreds of artworks by more than one hundred local artists. $10+ donation at the door.

Music by DJ Jon Eastman
Wine presented by Two Guys and a Lotta Wine
Food by Salute, Fire ‘n Spice, Ginza Japanese Restaurant

This is a benefit for Tao LaBossiere’s Open Heart Surgery.

20% or more of any sales will be generously donated to the “Tao LaBossiere Open Heart Fund.” ALL event proceeds will benefit the “Tao LaBossiere Open Heart Fund”. Tao is in need of open heart surgery and his catastrophic insurance will leave him with more than $45,000+ in medical bills. We are creating an art show that benefits all participating artists, as well as a Benefit for Tao, that will help him to avoid financial ruin from this unexpected necessary medical condition.

Tao LaBossiere has been volunteering to help artists and build up the artist community through ArtSpace Hartford Gallery since 1997. He is the volunteer force behind 18-21 art shows each year for the past 15 years, each attended by hundreds equaling thousands of lives touched yearly, by Tao’s assistance. If you have ever been part of an art show at Hartford ArtSpace Gallery, or if your friends have ever even attended an event, then you have directly benefited by his volunteer efforts. Additionally, you should note his years of volunteer support to the artists of Hartford Artists Open Studio Weekend, CowParade, West Hartford Art League, and Oil Drum Art. He is humbled and grateful for any and all help you decide to freely give.

If anyone would prefer to donate directly in lieu of participation, feel free to send a check to:
TD Bank
c/o Tao LaBossiere Open Heart Fund
203 Trumbull Street
Hartford, CT 06103

Or donate online at:
http://www.giveforward.com/taolabossiereopenheartfund

For those artists looking to participate:

$20 Entry Donation per piece, no limit to number of pieces an artist may submit. Size limit of 4 ft in any direction. Diptychs and Triptychs count as individual pieces.

First come, first served until the gallery is full, salon-style. We will direct you in hanging the work as it comes in and reserve the right to tweak the show to it’s best display for all.

Art Drop off:
Monday, Feb 4, 5 to 7 pm
Tuesday, Feb 5, 5 to 7 pm
and by appointment (contact Amy LaBossiere 860-543-3244)

Hope to see you there!! 





High Priestess

21 01 2013

I was fortunate enough to be invited to be a part of a show here at Artspace called, “The Oracles”. It was an amazing show where 22 artists were asked to create a tarot card, each one of the major arcana. I was asked to create the High Priestess.

Once I started reading about the High Priestess and everything she represents, I really felt like I needed more of her in my life. Basically, the High Priestess is about looking within and following your instincts. Knowing that you know best. I hadn’t been following my instincts and I feel it threw me off course for a little while. I’m back on track now, following what I feel and not over thinking things. (at least I try to… 🙂 easier said than done) She is mysterious and mystical and knows all. She is typically shown with a black and white pillar on each side of her, symbolizing dark and light decisions and she stands in contemplation between the two. Instead of the pillars, I have used the light itself to illustrate the light and dark sides of the high priestess. She is half in light and half in shadow. She is holding onto scrolls, information that you can see, but she is not quick to reveal.

She is usually crowned by the moon, shining light on what you may not have noticed before. I show the moon behind her following a spiral that emanates from her third eye. The Golden Spiral. I have always been fascinated with the Golden Ratio, as it’s the most aesthetically pleasing mathematical equation. It’s found in nature and in architecture. Whether it’s on purpose or an accident, it’s fascinating to me. It seems like a paradox–math and art–but also, so very obvious. Of course it can be boiled down to numbers. Of course there is order in this chaos. Of course everything is connected. You just have to listen. From your inner workings, to your outer world.

High PriestessHigh Priestess, 18″ x 24″, oil paint

This show was amazing to be a part of, and I’m so happy to have been involved in it. There was a tarot deck made from the 22 original pieces of artwork that were shown, which you can buy online here.

Thank you to Dawn Manogue who coordinated this project as a part of her culminating project for a Masters Degree in Integrative Health and Healing with the Graduate Institute.





Stephen Brown

4 11 2009

There have been many art teachers in my life. The so-so teachers show you how to do it, the good teachers teach you how to be better, using what they know, but the great ones teach you how to see. Stephen Brown was one of those teachers. Stephen passed away on October 21 after a long battle with cancer. It’s hard to say he was one of the most talented teachers at the University of Hartford’s Art School, because they have so many talented teachers. But he was.

Stephen Brown taught painting. Oil painting to be specific. He was able to push and pull the medium and give a flat surface an enormous amount of depth. In his class we painted countless still-lifes, which I still have to this day, and he taught me that a white wall is far from plain white. He didn’t just say it, he had a way of making you see it. He gave many students that “aha!” moment, when they realize how to paint. And it wasn’t just realism either. Although his work is mainly realist portraits, still-lifes, and landscapes his teaching applied to abstract painting as well. It was about color and composition and movement and line and space and all the elements of design.

A few days after I found out about the news, I knew when the calling hours were and sadly I could not make it. But I was driving in the car at the time when I looked up at the sky I saw a cloud that personified the Stephen Brown that we all know and love. First of all most of the clouds in the sky seemed to be painted on – maybe that was his doing. This particular cloud was not in front of the sun but off to the side and had a rainbow in it. I’ve never seen anything like it before, but it reminded me of everything he taught. In one white cloud were all the colors of the world – you just have to open your eyes and see it. I tried to take a photo of it, but anyone who has been taught by Stephen Brown knows that a photo can’t compare to the beauty that came from his paintbrush. He was an amazing teacher and I am a better artist because of him, as are many who have attended the Hartford Art School. HAS will never be the same. His beauty and legacy lives on in his paintings. My condolences go out to his family in this difficult time. He will be missed.

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For more information about Stephen Brown here is an article about the painter written by UNotes which is a University of Hartford news website.